Start Fund Annual Report

1 April 2017 - 31 March 2018

An elderly Vietnamese woman is seen standing in front of her damaged home after it was hit by typhoon Damrey. An elderly Vietnamese woman is seen standing in front of her damaged home after it was hit by typhoon Damrey.

© Laura-Louise Fairley, Start Network, alert 195 Vietnam | Hoa lost her livestock and her home was flooded when typhoon Damrey hit in November 2017.

© Laura-Louise Fairley, Start Network, alert 195 Vietnam | Hoa lost her livestock and her home was flooded when typhoon Damrey hit in November 2017.

Moving into its fifth year of operation, the Start Fund is the fastest collectively-owned funding mechanism in the world. It is a leading enabler of rapid, needs-driven humanitarian response for overlooked crises.


Catherine Sneath, Head of Start Funds, Start Network

Map of Start Fund alerts between 2014-2018.

Map of Start Fund alerts between 2014-2018.

Filling a critical gap in humanitarian financing, the Start Fund pools funding from donors for immediate release to its frontline 42 members and their local partners.

In 2017-18 alone the Start Fund awarded over £9 million to respond to the unmet needs of over 2 million people across 44 crises in 31 countries.

In 2017 the Start Fund was alerted to five of the world’s 12 most forgotten crises and responded to four. One of these was the Marawi armed conflict in the Philippines that left over 350,000 people displaced. The Start Fund was the first to release funding. The Start Fund has responded to many other crises this year that are too small to receive international attention. It has also funded responses to spikes in protracted crises in Yemen, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Central African Republic, Afghanistan and Syria.

In 2017, Start Fund Bangladesh – the first national Start Fund – was launched and activated three times within its first four months. Anticipatory alerts, aimed at shifting behaviour towards early action, are now an entrenched part of the Start Fund. The Start Network has also invested in research into blockchain technology, exploring its potential to improve humanitarian financing.

The Start Fund shines a light on crisis-affected communities and frequently leverages further funding from international donors. In 2017-18, well over £11 million in additional funding was secured by members implementing Start Fund projects. These members reported that the Start Fund played a role in leveraging 91% of this.

"The Start Network helps to convert the Grand Bargain commitments into real tangible support for the world’s most vulnerable people."

Ciarán Cannon, T.D. Minister of State for International Development and the Diaspora, Ireland

Two Vietnamese sisters are seen in their home after it was flooded by typhoon Damrey. Two Vietnamese sisters are seen in their home after it was flooded by typhoon Damrey.

© Laura-Louise Fairley, Start Network, alert 195 Vietnam | The home and crops of Anh and Hoa’s family were flooded by typhoon Damrey in November 2017.

© Laura-Louise Fairley, Start Network, alert 195 Vietnam | The home and crops of Anh and Hoa’s family were flooded by typhoon Damrey in November 2017.

Why is the Start Fund needed?

The Start Fund fills a critical funding gap by providing rapid financing to underfunded small to medium scale crises and spikes in chronic humanitarian crises, as well as by acting in anticipation of impending emergencies.

It is vital to ensure that the Start Fund is sufficiently resourced to enable critical humanitarian assistance to people in times of need.

A mother and her child take refuge after intense fighting in the Democratic Republic of the Congo A mother and her child take refuge after intense fighting in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

© Ninon Ndayikengurukiye, CARE International, alert 214 Burundi | A mother and her child take refuge after intense fighting in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

© Ninon Ndayikengurukiye, CARE International, alert 214 Burundi | A mother and her child take refuge after intense fighting in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Achievements in year 4

In 2017 the Start Fund was alerted to five of the world’s 12 most forgotten crises and responded to four. One of these was the Marawi armed conflict in the Philippines that left over 350,000 people displaced. The Start Fund was the first to release funding. The Start Fund has responded to many other crises this year that are too small to receive international attention.

It has also funded responses to spikes in protracted crises in Yemen, South Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Central African Republic, Afghanistan and Syria.

This year, Start Network members used forecasting information to submit 10 anticipation alerts to the Start Fund. Five of these were activated and responded to: anticipation of drought in Timor-Leste, flooding and landslides in Tajikistan, election-related violence in Kenya, displacement from Pakistan to Afghanistan and flooding and cholera in Malawi. Read the Start Fund Crisis Anticipation Window Annual Report for 2017 to find out more.

© Ma April R. Dela Cruz, Catholic Relief Services, alert 165 Philippines | Ricondaya Menor receives shelter assistance consisting of plywood, nails and lumbers.

© Ma April R. Dela Cruz, Catholic Relief Services, alert 165 Philippines | Ricondaya Menor receives shelter assistance consisting of plywood, nails and lumbers.

© Tran Thai Khuong, Catholic Relief Services, alert 195 Vietnam | Duong Thi Phan receives a hygiene kit as part of a typhoon response.

© Tran Thai Khuong, Catholic Relief Services, alert 195 Vietnam | Duong Thi Phan receives a hygiene kit as part of a typhoon response.

The power of the network

We believe there is power in collaboration. The network gives its members the collective ability to manage resources with increased impartiality.

© CADENA, alert 186 Mexico | CADENA unload aid and prepare for distribution in response to cyclone Lidia.

© CADENA, alert 186 Mexico | CADENA unload aid and prepare for distribution in response to cyclone Lidia.

The Start Fund is made possible through our network The Start Fund is made possible through our network

The Start Network is founded on the principle that the humanitarian challenges we face are greater than any one organisation can overcome on its own.

There is power in collaboration. The network gives its members the collective ability to manage resources with increased impartiality.

The Start Fund enables collective decision making and shared information at project, crisis and system level. Decisions on the allocation of funding and selection of projects benefit from the pooled knowledge of members, bringing different voices, perspectives and insights together to generate informed and objective decisions.

To further embed decision making within affected countries and ensure fast, consistent and robust decisions at a local level, the Start Network has established standing decision-making groups in 12 crisis-prone countries who can be quickly mobilised if an alert is raised. Four regional advisors have been recruited from member organisations to act as focal points for the Start Network and coordinate the decision-making groups.

The Start Fund values external expertise to strengthen decision making and continues to work with ACAPS (the Assessment Capacities Project) which provides rapid, independent information about crises to inform decisions. In 2017-18 it has also diversified its sources of technical expertise, building partnerships with academic institutions and other humanitarian bodies.

"Collaborative decision making amongst peers is one of the Start Fund’s strongest assets. Every time we meet I see how the diversity of viewpoints, experience and organisational mandates helps create a shared decision built on more analysis and wisdom than a single individual or agency could ever bring alone"
Mike Noyes, Deputy Director for Humanitarian Policy and Practice, ActionAid UK

The year in numbers

In its fourth year, the Start Fund grew in scale and reach, responding to more crises, acting in anticipation of more disasters and helping more people than ever before.

Press office of the Hudaydah municipality, alert 200 Yemen | Medical staff administer diphtheria vaccinations to children.

Press office of the Hudaydah municipality, alert 200 Yemen | Medical staff are seen administering diphtheria vaccines to children.

Crisis anticipation

Start Fund's approach to forecast-based early action.

A local health worker looks out of a window whilst providing support for a medical response A local health worker looks out of a window whilst providing support for a medical response

© John Wessels, ALIMA, alert 160, the Democratic Republic of Congo | Bie Lipasa, a local health worker in Muma, supports the Ebola response

© John Wessels, ALIMA, alert 160 Democratic Republic of Congo | Bie Lipasa a local health worker is seen inside a health centre on June 13, 2017 in Muma.

The Start Fund’s Crisis Anticipation Window is a systematic way for Start Network members to respond earlier to support communities ahead of a crisis.

This has been an important year for anticipation. Recognising its transformative potential, the Start Network has moved closer to normalising this approach.

The Start Fund received 10 anticipation alerts this year and activated five, a 67% increase on the previous year. In the wider sector, other pooled funds have followed our lead and are starting to adopt forecast-based action.

The Start Network is now working with the Red Cross and national governments in a project led by the Overseas Development Institute looking at the potential for scaling up forecast-based early action in a range of countries.

The Start Network has this year invested significantly in improving the quality of Start Fund anticipation alerts. Over 300 people from member organisations have been trained in anticipatory alerts, a global risk calendar has been developed and monthly risk briefings are prepared and shared widely to inform members and encourage anticipatory preventative action.

This year we have developed partnerships outside the traditional humanitarian system to enable systematic use of forecasting information. The Start Network has also set up a community of anticipation practitioners called FOREWARN to bring together evidence and disseminate it across the network.

The Start Fund Crisis Anticipation Window Annual Report 2017 sets out the changes that have been made since its launch in 2016, identifies lessons learned and outlines the plan to normalise and embed anticipation across the Start Network.

Localisation

Localisation is a fundamental and non-negotiable principle within the Start Network.

© Humanity and Inclusion, alert B003 Bangladesh | Communities receive cash grants to buy materials and rebuild their homes after they were destroyed in floods.

© Humanity and Inclusion, alert B003 Bangladesh | Communities receive cash grants to buy materials and rebuild their homes after they were destroyed in floods.

Making local, central

Localisation is the process of recognising, respecting and strengthening the leadership by local authorities and the capacity of local civil society in humanitarian action, to better address the needs of affected populations and to prepare national actors for future humanitarian responses. It is a fundamental and non-negotiable principle within the Start Network.

In 2017, the Start Network published The Start Fund, Start Network and Localisation: Current situation and future directions. Building upon the Grand Bargain commitments, this report offers recommendations on how to progress the localisation agenda.

Local partners

This year the Start Fund has supported the work of at least 80 local and national partners to implement crisis response. Their frontline experience and knowledge is invaluable to ensuring quality and timely humanitarian response.

Start Fund is improving its reporting process to better capture the work of local partners. Start Fund has also supported local partners in Syria who unfortunately cannot be listed for security reasons.

Localisation: Bangladesh

Start Fund Bangladesh was launched in 2017 as part of the Start Network’s aim of developing independent national Start Fund mechanisms.

The four goals for this national Start Fund are to:

  1. Enable an earlier and faster response to crisis-affected people in Bangladesh
  2. Attract additional and better donor funding to Bangladesh
  3. Devolve the Start Fund to a national level, giving national and local responders direct access to funding
  4. Practice, measure and showcase the benefits of collaboration in humanitarian action

Start Fund Bangladesh has a disbursement pot of around £2.2 million per year to directly fund responses throughout the country. A 24-member committee has been established to oversee the new fund and includes Start Network member agencies as well as six national and local NGOs.

This year, Start Fund Bangladesh was alerted to five disasters and responded to four (cyclone Mora, landslides, flooding and a slum fire), reaching around 140,000 people with critical humanitarian aid, including cash, food security and livelihoods support, shelter, water, sanitation and hygiene, education, health and nutrition provisions.

The Start Network believes transparency enables better accountability and increases efficiency and effectiveness in the humanitarian sector.

Transparency is also a critical condition to regaining public trust in civil society and its spending of public funding. The Start Network is committed to improving the publication of data through the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI) and is working on several initiatives that explore increased transparency, both for Start Network programmes and the wider sector.

The online Start Fund Portal is a vital element of the network infrastructure and will continue to expand in functionality in the coming years.

Start Network’s innovation work on testing blockchain as a new way of record-keeping and sharing provides one of the first test cases in the humanitarian sector of this technology.

Image: © Enayatullah Azad, Norwegian Refugee Council, alert 199 Afghanistan | Families from Tebar village live in Sar-e-Pol city after conflict left them displaced from their homes.
Image: © Himaloy Joseph Mree, World Vision, B002 Bangladesh | Floods ravaged Sharmin's home in June 2017. Her family was provided with cash to help them in the aftermath.

Case study: Pacific Islands of Vanuatu and Tonga

The small Pacific island of Vanuatu is the world’s most vulnerable country to natural hazards, as it is located on the earthquake prone ‘ring of fire’, sits at the centre of the Pacific cyclone belt and is already suffering from the impacts of climate change. Neighbouring Tonga is a very close second. This year the Start Fund responded to crises in both.

In September 2017, the volcano on the island of Ambae, Vanuatu, started erupting. By the end of the month, the government had ordered a complete evacuation of the island, home to about 11,000 people. Soon after, Save the Children raised the alert and along with CARE International were awarded funding to undertake a joint response to this unprecedented displacement. They provided children with a safe place to learn and play, which allowed their parents time to deal with other urgent issues during their displacement. They also distributed essential hygiene and dignity kits to help mitigate the risk of disease outbreak.

The Start Network continues to work on extending the global reach of the Start Fund, which now spreads well beyond countries renowned for major disasters, to smaller – often more vulnerable – locations. More country level member teams and their local partners are becoming familiar with the Start Fund and raising the alarm when disaster strikes.

On 12 February 2018, Tonga was devastated by cyclone Gita, the worst storm to hit the country in 60 years. Around 50,000 people were affected as the cyclone damaged and destroyed homes, leaving families without shelter and basic resources. Oxfam immediately raised a Start Fund alert and CARE International were selected to provide vital water, sanitation, hygiene and shelter to the most vulnerable people. CARE International worked in close partnership with two local organisations: Mainstreaming of Rural Development Innovation Tonga Trust (MORDI) and Live & Learn Environmental Education. Within just a few days of the storm hitting, shelter and hygiene kits were distributed, roofs had been repaired and support provided to families who had lost everything.

Just two weeks after the cyclone hit, when other humanitarian agencies were only starting to respond, through the Start Fund, CARE International and partners had already completed the emergency phase of their own response and were well into the planning of early recovery.

Image: © Save the Children, alert 191 Vanuatu | A child-friendly space established in response to the eruption of volcano Ambae.
Image: © Bill Flinn, CARE UK, alert 217 Tonga | Homes were completely destroyed by cyclone Gita.

"The rapid process of the Start Fund enabled CARE International to support families to recover quickly. We could not have done this without our strong local partners MORDI and Live & Learn.”
Bill Flinn, Senior Shelter Advisor, CARE International

Case study: Anticipating violence during high-stakes elections

Hoping for the best but preparing for the worst. The Start Fund enabled members in Kenya to act early to mitigate the risk of election violence, through a collaborative, informed response.

In August 2017, the people of Kenya went to the polls to vote in a fiercely contested presidential election. Ten years earlier, when the election result was disputed, more than 1,000 people died and 600,000 were displaced. Two months prior to the August elections, there were already signs of unrest and Start Network members became increasingly concerned about the developing tensions in the country and the growing risk of violence. In June 2017, ActionAid, Islamic Relief, Trocaire and World Vision conducted an inter-agency context analysis ahead of the election, using the Good Enough Context Analysis for Rapid Response (GECARR) tool, supported by the Start Fund’s Analysis for Action grant. The analysis considered likely hotspots for violence and produced recommendations for a range of likely scenarios.

The findings from the GECARR analysis triggered a Start Fund anticipation alert on 17 July 2017. Start Network members released £300,000 to fund a consortium project (submitted by 11 members and led by ActionAid). It focused on six high-risk counties and aimed at filling gaps in the Kenya Government National Contingency Plan. Agencies prepared for potential unrest by strengthening coordination between organisations, monitoring for signs of potential violence such as hate speech, and working with faith leaders to promote peace building. They also trained local organisations on humanitarian assessments, pre-positioned supplies in high-risk areas, set up safe spaces for children, and worked to help communities develop their own plans in case violence erupted.

As feared, there were considerable levels of tension throughout the country from July to November: more than 70 people died because of riots and protests. The ongoing drought in Kenya made some communities more vulnerable and compounded the tension.

"It was a long process preparing for the elections. When you get near the end, it’s very difficult to raise capital quickly – right when you see dynamics changing. The Start Fund adds value when we’re coming down to the wire. Other funding comes in after risks have materialised."
World Vision representative in Kenya

Through the Start Fund response, conflict prevention interventions increased adoption of constitutional mechanisms by communities to address political grievances. There was significantly less conflict than in previous elections.

The result of the August election was annulled, and the election rescheduled, as had been forecast though the GECARR process. In November, President Uhuru Kenyatta was finally sworn in. Tensions and risks during this period remained extremely high, but the flexibility of the Start Fund meant that agencies were able to extend the project while it was still needed. Bijay Kumar, Executive Director of ActionAid Kenya, explained that this flexibility ‘was key to providing appropriate responses in a changing political environment.

Image: © Dorcas Aid, alert 175 Kenya | Start Network members and partners run a peace forum with community leaders to talk about the risks of election-related violence.
Image: © Dorcas Aid, alert 175 Kenya | Relief items are distributed as part of a wider collaborative effort to mitigate the risks of election-based violence and displacement.

Case study: Responding to disease outbreak in Yemen

The world is facing the largest humanitarian crisis since the end of the Second World War and Yemen is at the centre of this catastrophe.

In 2017, Yemen fell into the grip of a severe cholera epidemic on an unprecedented scale. By the end of the year, more than 900,000 suspected cases were reported, making it the worst outbreak of the disease in recorded history. It became clear that existing aid was not enough to counter the spiralling number of cases, so in May 2017 Start Network members raised an alert to the Start Fund. Within 53 hours, around £300,000 was awarded to International Medical Corps, Relief International and Save the Children to implement life-saving rapid response programmes.

Image: © Save the Children, alert 200 Yemen | A father holds his daughter as nurses provide a vaccination against diphtheria.

The agencies focused on both treating the disease and preventing further spread, looking to long-term approaches including water quality monitoring. Health and sanitation specialists ran education sessions, distributed family hygiene kits, and mobilised community health volunteers to identify suspected cases and refer them to the nearest health centre .

Not long after the cholera outbreak, Yemen faced yet another blow when an outbreak of diphtheria struck the country. In December, the Start Fund received its 200th alert and awarded £154,863 to Relief International and Save the Children, which they used to train healthcare providers on better treatment and reporting of cases, and to set up isolation centres. They also ran awareness campaigns and education sessions at clinics, schools, markets, mosques and community gatherings.

Image: © Relief International, alert 200 Yemen | A beneficiary is seen filling out relevant documents to receive support to tackle the outbreak of Diphtheria.

This response demonstrated how the Start Network is leading for change in humanitarian aid. In Yemen, local coordination and decision making within the Start Network enabled the rapid release of aid which reached people suffering from cholera and diphtheria within just days. Agencies were not delayed by the need for cumbersome grant applications and were allowed high flexibility to adapt their work to the situation as it evolved.

Thanks to the Start Fund’s rapid response mechanism, many lives may have been saved. But while new cases of disease were in decline in early 2018, the situation continues to deteriorate in Yemen and the risk of a surge in cases increases with seasonal rains. The Start Fund is working closely with members to act in anticipation of further spikes in disease outbreak during this devastating protracted crisis.

Image: © Save the Children, alert 200 Yemen | A young girl is treated for diphtheria.

“Because of the speed of the Start Fund, teams were able to develop trusted relationships with local governments and other NGOs during implementation. This strengthened the capacity of local health systems.”
Anas Homid, Save the Children

Future of the Start Network and the evolution of the Start Fund

The Start Fund is saving lives, alleviating suffering and protecting dignity by driving change in the humanitarian sector.

The Start Fund enables its members and their local partners to respond rapidly in crises that would otherwise receive slow and inadequate funding. It challenges the status quo by focusing on disasters that do not make the headlines. This reduces the usual funding bias, driven by politics and the media, towards large-scale crises.

The Start Fund has a role to play in righting the imbalances of the humanitarian system by ensuring that local committees close to affected communities design and select the most appropriate responses to crises.

“Collaboration is a central theme of Start Network decision making, indeed the Start Fund is possibly unique amongst pooled funds as a ‘peer to peer’ decision-making mechanism.”
External Evaluation of the Start Fund, November 2017

To prepare for the change needed in the future, Start Network members have worked together to co-create a vision based on our eight-year experience.

In November 2017, Start Network members unanimously agreed to support an ambitious plan for the evolution of the network. The plan sets out a concrete framework designed to reflect the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit, meet the challenges of the modern world and to tackle the inherent problems in the international humanitarian aid system.

The vision of the Start Network had long been clear, but the challenge was how to achieve it. So, in early 2017, the Start Network embarked on a process to ‘co-design’ its future. Members across the globe, as well as donors and partners, came together at conferences, events, meetings, and on task teams, while others responded through surveys or on social media.

The resulting paper sets out a clear framework of how the vision will be achieved. The Start Fund will be central to its realisation. In the long term, the aim is for the global Start Fund to become one of several funds, making up a ‘family of funds’, and instead of one centralised network a ‘network of networks’ made up of national and regional hubs will constitute the Start Network.

You can read the full paper on the Start Network website.

Start Fund financial statement. Start Fund financial statement.

Start Fund financial statement

Start Fund financial statement

Partners

The Start Fund has supported the work of the following local and national partners to implement crisis response. Their frontline experience and knowledge is invaluable to ensuring quality and timely humanitarian response.*

  • Aasaman Nepal (alert 181)
  • Action Africa Help (alert 192)
  • Aging with a Smile Initiative (alert 189)
  • Al-Mujadilah Development Foundation, Inc (alert 165)
  • Association Libre pour la Promotion de l’Habitat et du Logement (ALPHALOG) (alert 156)
  • Anglican Diocesan Development Society, Makurdi (ADDS) (alert 187)
  • Asociación Fundación para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Comunal de El Salvador (CORDES) (alert 170)
  • Asociación para la Promoción de los Derechos Humanos de la Niñez en El Salvador (APRODEHNI) (alert 170)
  • Association d’Appui aux Activites de Sante Communautaire (alert 151)
  • Backward Society Education Nepal (BASE) (alert 181)
  • Baptist Convention Sierra Leone (alert 179)
  • Binifu Faef Nome (BIFANO) (alert 158)
  • Caritas Bunia (alert 219)
  • Caritas Centrafrique (alert 163)
  • Cáritas de Guatemala (alert 188)
  • Caritas India (alert 172, 180)
  • Caritas Sierra Leone (alert 179)
  • Centro Communidade Covalima (CCC) (alert 158)
  • Code Utile (alert 151)
  • Community Association for Psychosocial Services (CAPs) (alert 179)
  • Community Health Department (CHD) (alert 168)
  • Coordinadora Nacional para la Reducción de Desastres (CONRED) (alert 188)
  • Development for a Better Being (DEMI-E) (alert 159)
  • DEC-Nepal (DEC) (alert 181)
  • Diocese Social Action Center Iligan (alert 165, 202)
  • Ecumenical Office for Development Support (BOAD) (alert 198)
  • Enfants Sans Frontières (ESF) (alert 163)
  • Evangelical Fellowship of Sierra Leone (alert 179)
  • Evangelical Fraternity of Albania (VUSH) (alert 197)
  • FHRD Nepal (alert 181)
  • Fini Ensperansa (alert 158)
  • Forum for Health Research and Development Nepal (FHRD) (alert 181)
  • Fraterna (alert 158)
  • Fundación Salvadoreña para la Promoción Social y el Desarrollo Económico (FUNSALPRODESE) (alert 170)
  • Future for Children Sierra Leone (alert 179)
  • Gaia (alert 169)
  • Great Lakes Inkingi Development (GLID) (alert 214)
  • Humanitarian Response Consortium (HRC) (alert 165, 202)
  • IDEALS (alert 165)
  • Indo-Global Social Service Society (IGSSS) (alert 172)
  • Initiative for Promotion of Rural Health and Development (IPROSARUDE) (alert 214)
  • Innovations and Participation for Development (IPD) (alert 173)
  • Institute of Peace and Development in Mindanao (alert 165)
  • Kdadalak Sulimutuk Institute (alert 158)
  • Live & Learn Environmental Education (alert 217)
  • Local Social Development and Economic Solidarity Department (LSDESD) (alert 156)
  • Mali Local Social Development and Economic Solidarity Department (alert 156)
  • Mainstreaming of Rural Development Innovation (MORDI) (alert 217)
  • MANEPO (alert 220)
  • Maranao People Development Center (MARADECA) (alert 165)
  • Mexican Civil Protection (alert 169, 212)
  • National Disaster Management Agency of the Gambia (alert 189)
  • National Rehabilitation Center (alert 179)
  • Nav Jagriti (alert 180)
  • Nepalgunj Medical College (NGMG) (alert 181)
  • Network of HIV Positives in Sierra Leone (NETHIPS) (alert 179)
  • Nonviolent Peaceforce (alert 165)
  • Partner Programme de Promotion des Soins de Santé (PPSSP) (alert 198, 219)
  • Pastoral Social Diocese of San Marcos (alert 188)
  • Permakultura Timor-Leste (PERMATIL) (alert 158)
  • Poorvanchal Gramin Vikas Sansthan (PGVS) (alert 180)
  • Promotion and Advancement of Justice, Harmony and Rights of Adivasis (PAJHRA) (alert 172)
  • The Rainbow Initiative (alert 179)
  • Red Kuchub’al (alert 188)
  • Rural Agency for Community Development and Assistance (RACIDA) (alert 222)
  • Rural Volunteers Centre (RVC) (alert 172)
  • Sahakarya Nepal (alert 181)
  • Save the Saptari (alert 181)
  • Shohratgarh Environmental Society (alert 180)
  • Solidarité Coopérative Agricole du Congo (SOCOAC) (alert 198)
  • Street Child of Sierra Leone (alert 179)
  • Tezpur Social Service Society (TSSS) (alert 172)
  • Thang Binh People’s Committee (alert 195)
  • United Purpose (UP) (alert 189)
  • United Youth of the Philippines-Women (UnYPhil-Women) (alert 165)
  • National Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (various)
  • Women’s Network for Environmental Sustainability (WoNES) (alert 179)
  • Yemen Ministry of Public Health (alert 200)
  • Youth in Action Towards Sustainability (Y-ACTS) (alert 158)
  • Zambia Ministry of Health (alert 192)

*This list is not exhaustive. Start Fund is improving its reporting process to better capture the work of partners. Start Fund has also supported local partners in Syria who unfortunately cannot be listed for security reasons.

A man is seen holding up his cash voucher after his home was destroyed during floods in Bangladesh. Image by Sharaful Hossain, Humanity & Inclusion, alert B003 Bangladesh. A man is seen holding up his cash voucher after his home was destroyed during floods in Bangladesh. Image by Sharaful Hossain, Humanity & Inclusion, alert B003 Bangladesh.

© Sharaful Hossain, Humanity & Inclusion, alert B003 Bangladesh | A man receives a cash voucher after his home was destroyed during floods in Bangladesh.

© Sharaful Hossain, Humanity & Inclusion, alert B003 Bangladesh | A man receives a cash voucher after his home was destroyed during floods in Bangladesh.